Are you the publisher? Claim this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search



Account: (login)

More Channels


Channel Catalog


Channel Description:

Real-Time News for Syracuse and Central New York

older | 1 | .... | 938 | 939 | 940 | (Page 941) | 942 | 943 | 944 | .... | 1993 | newer

    Products now on store shelves around the SU campus could lead to seizures, hallucinations and medical problems, the senator says.

    Syracuse, NY -- U.S. Sen. Charles E. Schumer is coming to Syracuse today to call for immediate passage of a bill that would ban the sale of synthetic marijuana.

    The David Mitchell Rozga Act would ban the sale of "Legal Phunk," "Spice" and other synthetic marijuana products that Schumer says are now on store shelves around the Syracuse University campus.

    The substances can lead to seizures, hallucinations, high blood pressure, rapid heart rates, panic attacks and dangerous and erratic behavior, according to an announcement from Schumer's office. Producers have tried to get around Drug Enforcement Agency bans by changing the chemical compound in their products and repackaging them. The proposed law would ban that practice.

    The bill was introduced nearly a year ago by Sen. Chuck Grassley, D-Iowa.

    Syracuse police, Onondaga and, Madison county health officials and representatives of the Upstate New York Poison Center are expected to join Schumer, D-NY, at a 12:45 pm. news conference at the Onondaga County Courthouse.


    The Princeton Review selected the Best Value Colleges from data and surveys of 650 colleges and universities.

    Syracuse, NY – The SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry was named one of the nation’s “Best Value” colleges and universities by The Princeton Review.

    The Princeton Review included ESF in its just-published book “The Best Value Colleges: 2012 Edition” and a on a special area on its website at www.princetonreview.com/best-value-colleges.aspx.
    The Review’s Senior Vice President/ Publisher, Robert Franek, commended SUNY-ESF for keeping costs down, offering generous aid to applicants with financial need and maintaining excellent academic programs.

    The Review selected the Best Value Colleges based on institutional data and student opinion surveys from 650 colleges and universities.


    Mention Irish Night when you buy a ticket and a portion of the sale will go to the parade.

    Syracuse, NY--The Syracuse St. Patrick's Parade hopes to score Friday at Irish Night at the Crunch.

    A portion of the ticket sales from the Crunch game against the Albany Devils will go to the parade when fans mention Irish Night when the buy a ticket.

    The game starts at 7:30 p.m. at the War Memorial, 411 Montgomery St., Syracuse.

    Fans are also asked to bring a non-perishable food item to donate to the Hunger Project.

    The 30th Syracuse St. Patrick's Parade sponsored by Guinness steps off at noon on March 17, on South Salina Street in Syracuse.


    Also: Two U.S. troops killed in Afghanistan in Koran burning backlash; Obama to address gas prices, pitch energy policy.

    APTOPIX Washington School.JPGAn Armin Jahr Elementary School student talks with a police officer in front of the school Wednesday in Bremerton, Wash. An 8-year-old girl was shot in the abdomen at the elementary school and one of her classmates was detained, authorities said. The injured third-grader was airlifted to Seattle's Harborview Medical Center. Authorities said a third-grade boy was being questioned and a firearm was found in a classroom.

    From The Associated Press:

    SEATTLE — Police say a gun brought to a Washington state elementary school in a third grader's backpack discharged, apparently by accident, critically wounding an 8-year-old classmate.

    Investigators were trying to determine how the 9-year-old boy got the gun and why he brought it to school, a Bremerton, Wash., police spokesman said.

    "At this stage of the investigation, detectives believe the shooting was accidental," Lt. Peter Fisher said in a statement late Wednesday.

    At the end of Wednesday's school day, a bullet went through the backpack and hit the little girl, Fisher said.

    Amina Kocer-Bowman was in critical condition Wednesday night after surgery at Harborview Medical Center in Seattle, hospital spokeswoman Leila Gray said.

    The Bremerton Schools superintendent's office said the girl was shot in the abdomen.

    » Read the full story: Police say Wash. school shooting was apparently accidental


    In other news ...

    » Two U.S. troops killed in Afghanistan in Koran burning backlash [CBS News]

    » GOP candidates face off in high-stakes debate in Arizona [Fox News]

    » Syrian tanks attack in Homs, world outrage grows [Reuters]

    » Obama to address gas prices, pitch energy policy [TIME]

    » Greece to vote on $142 billion debt relief deal with private investors [Washington Post]


    Read all of today's obits from The Post-Standard

    o353273lang1.JPGRichard E. Lang

    Richard E. Lang, 66, of Jamesville, passed away peacefully in his home on the morning of Tuesday, February 21. Richard was born on June 19, 1945, to Kathryn and William Lang in Liverpool, NY, and was a graduate of Liverpool High School in 1963. Richard was a U.S. Army veteran, having served from 1966-1969, and was a retiree from New Process Gear, where he worked for 30 years. Richard was an amazing husband and father, and was an active member of the community, serving as a volunteer fireman for the Sentinel Heights Fire Department for 20 years. Richard touched many lives as a girls' softball coach at LaFayette High School, Syracuse University, and as the head coach for the Empire State Games CNY Softball Team, where his teams won two consecutive gold medals. After his retirement, Richard founded the CNY PT Cruiser Owners Club, allowing him to remain close to his work and his passion, Chrysler vehicles. Richard and Sue traveled all over to shows and events as part of the PT Cruiser Club, where they met many of their closest friends.

    » Read Richard Lang's full obituary on syracuse.com

    » View and sign Richard Lang's online guestbook

    » See all of today's obituaries from The Post-Standard

    » Read local and national obituaries on syracuse.com

    Today's obituaries


    The second victim is expected to be released from the hospital as police still seek their assailants. Watch video

    Gallery preview

    Syracuse, NY – One of the victims in Wednesday’s shooting on Furman Street remains in critical condition at a Syracuse hospital, but the other victim is expected to be released from the same facility, police said.

    No arrests have been made, police said.

    Ronnie Davis, 15, was brought to Upstate University Hospital in critical condition after he was found with at least one gunshot wound in the back seat of a car that had crashed on East Castle street. He remained in that condition this morning, Sgt. Tom Connellan said.

    Lamyke Kelly, 17, who was found wounded on Furman Street, was grazed in the same attack in which Davis was shot, Connellan said. His injuries were minor and he is expected to be released, he said.

    According to police, Davis and Kelly were riding in a Honda car that was attacked shortly after 2 p.m. Wednesday on Furman Street by gunfire from a dark-colored sport-utility vehicle. Kelly fled from the Honda there. The SUV sped up Furman. The Honda sped in the other direction and was struck by a truck near South Salina and East Castle streets.

    The SUV used in the attack has not been found, Connellan said. Anyone with information is asked call Syracuse police at 442-5222. All calls will be kept confidential, he said.


    Panels will discuss media coverage of Penn State and Syracuse cases.

    Live feed scheduled to begin at 10 a.m.

    2011-11-30-MeloCenter-EMB.JPGESPN reporter Mark Schwarz reporting on the Bernie Fine investigation Nov. 30 outside the Carmelo K. Anthony Basketball Center at Syracuse University.

    Syracuse University's S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications will host a daylong symposium today on the media's role in covering college sports scandals.

    "When Games Turn Grim: Can Media Cover Sports Scandals Responsibly?" will be from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the Joyce Hergenhan Auditorium in Newhouse 3.

    The event is open to the public will be webcast live here and at sportsandscandal.syr.edu. Follow on Twitter at #sportscandal.

    The first panel, "The Journalists," will feature a discussion by key journalists who have worked on these kinds of stories. Panelists include Michael J. Connor, executive editor of The Post-Standard, Mike McAndrew, reporter and editor with The Post-Standard; Mike Feeley, assistant managing editor of The Patriot-News in Harrisburg, Pa.; Jeff D'Alessio, special assistant to the CEO, Sporting News; Pete Thamel, college sports reporter with The New York Times; and Vince Doria, senior vice president and director of news with ESPN.

    The second panel, "The Advocates," at 1 p.m., includes Robert Hoatson, executive director of Road to Recovery; Katherine Redmond, founder of the National Coalition Against Violent Athletes; Julie Cecile, executive director of McMahon/Ryan Child Advocacy Center in Syracuse; and Allison Young, director of sexual abuse services with Elmcrest Children's Center in Syracuse.

    The third panel, "The PR Professionals," at 2:30 p.m., includes Leland Bassett, chairman and CEO of Bassett and Bassett Incorporated, Communications Managers and Counselors; Keith Burton, president of Insidedge; Gary Grates, principal of WCG Worldwide; and Kelly Rossman-McKinney, CEO and principal, Truscott Rossman.

    The fourth panel, "The Ethicists," at 3:50 p.m., includes David Rubin, professor and dean emeritus of Newhouse School; Tom Rosenstiel, director and founder of the Project for Excellence in Journalism; and Robert Steele, professor and director of the Janet Prindle Institute for Ethics at DePauw University.

    Each panel will conclude with a question-and-answer session.

    The event is free and open to the public. Parking is available in SU pay lots. For more information about the event, see sportsandscandal.syr.edu.


    SYRACUSE, N.Y. -- Eight paid summer internships are available in Central New York this year for college students interested in the field of biomass energy. The internships at eight local companies are being coordinated by the State University College of Environmental Science and Forestry, the Syracuse Center of Excellence and CenterState Corporation for Economic Opportunity. Funding comes from the U.S....

    SYRACUSE, N.Y. -- Eight paid summer internships are available in Central New York this year for college students interested in the field of biomass energy.

    The internships at eight local companies are being coordinated by the State University College of Environmental Science and Forestry, the Syracuse Center of Excellence and CenterState Corporation for Economic Opportunity. Funding comes from the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

    Participating companies are Antares Group, ACT Bioenergy, Mascoma, Mesa Reduction Engineering and Processing, New England Wood Pellet, O’Brien & Gere, ReEnergy and Sunoco.

    Biomass -- including wood, crops and other organic material -- can be used as a renewable source of heat, power, fuel and consumer products.

    For more information, contact Aimee Clinkhammer at the Syracuse Center of Excellence (315-443-3741) or Timothy Volk at ESF (315-470-6774).


    A traffic stop in Cayuga County last year resulted in 2 men from NYC being charged with criminal possession of over one-half pound of cocaine. Watch video

    crime_icon_2 copy.jpg

    A roundup of news and events from Cayuga County

    Cayuga County District Attorney Jon E. Budelmann announced today that his office secured the conviction of Chitunda Capers, 32, of 880 Colgate Avenue, Apartment 5d, Bronx, New York of the class “A-II” felony of criminal possession of cocaine (possession of cocaine greater than 4 ounces) and Paul Foy, 44, of 1657 Union Port, Queens, New York of the Class “B” felony of possession cocaine with the intention of selling it, according to the Finger Lakes Daily News.

    On April 12, 2011, Capers and Foy were driving in Caper’s Lexus on the New York State Thruway in the Town of Mentz in Cayuga County. They were pulled over by the New York State Police for having tinted windows. The state trooper asked to search the vehicle after the men gave conflicting stories regarding their destination and were acting suspiciously. The search yielded a small amount of marijuana, over three thousand dollars cash and 249 grams (over one-half pound) of cocaine. The cocaine had a street value of over $30,000. Capers faces 5 years in prison and 2 years of post release supervision. Foy will be sentenced as an accomplice to 1 year in jail.

    More Cayuga County news
    » Four charged in home invasion burglary, beating in Montezuma [The Post-Standard]
    » County part of new prevention program [Auburn Citizen]
    » Finger Lakes chef Dano Hutnik named regional semi-finalist in James Beard awards [The Post-Standard]
    » Lucy Kaplansky to bring big voice to Auburn Public Theater [The Post-Standard]

    Cayuga County resources
    » Today's weather forecast
    » Today's obituaries
    » What's going on? Events calendar for Cayuga County | » Onondaga County reported crimes database
    » See all Cayuga County news on syracuse.com
    » Police Blotter


    Brantley Carroll was extradited from Hawaii to face 17-count indictment here.

    2010-03-03-jb-brantley1.JPGBrantley Carroll

    Syracuse, NY - A Syracuse-area photographer was arraigned in Onondaga County Court today on a 17-count sexual assault indictment after being returned from Hawaii to face the charges.

    Brantley M. Carroll, 50, is facing two counts each of second-degree rape and endangering the welfare of a child, one count of third-degree rape and six counts each of second-degree criminal sexual act and third-degree sexual abuse.

    County Judge Anthony Aloi ordered Carroll to remain in the Justice Center jail without bail after defense lawyer Donald VanStry entered a "not guilty" plea for the defendant.

    Authorities said Carroll was arrested Jan. 31 at his home in Waikiki on a warrant issued after a Syracuse grand jury handed down a sealed indictment against him.

    VanStry said Carroll would have voluntarily returned to Syracuse to face the charges had he known about them. Carroll has family in the Syracuse area but was working as a wedding photographer in Hawaii when arrested, the lawyer said.

    Assistant District Attorney Beth Van Doren told Aloi Carroll had been living in California before he "fled the country" upon learning that a victim here had contacted police. He later returned to Hawaii where he was arrested, the prosecutor said.

    Van Doren asked that Carroll be held without bail or with bail of at least $300,000.

    Aloi granted the "no bail" request and adjourned the case to March 16 for further discussions with the lawyers and to April 13 for argument of motions.


    Read all of today's letters and editorials from The Post-Standard.

    Santorum 2012.JPGRepublican presidential candidate and former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum speaks during a campaign rally at the Sabbar Shrine Center Wednesday in Tucson, Arizona.

    Tracking commentary and opinion from around Central New York, the state and nation:

    Thursday's topic

    Elizabeth Seager, of Syracuse, writes about Republican presidential candidate Rick Santorum and says that while he "express[es] his views in a civilized manner," his position on religious matters, specifically on the use of contraception, is too extreme:

    "Rick Santorum is an amiable zealot. Since most zealots are not amiable, I give him credit for expressing his views in a civilized manner.

    "However, he goes beyond abortion and advocates that the states outlaw contraception. If I hadn’t seen and heard him say this, I never would have believed it. When people use or don’t use contraception, it’s their own business. Amiable or not, extremism in the defense of any religion is not a good thing."


    The rest of today's letters to the editor

    » Politicians who write back get vote
    » Romney and GOP cater to the rich
    » Keep returning soldiers in mind
    » Parking fees seem to add up fast
    » National anthem started as a poem
    » Medicare rigging rules against reimbursement
    » Name-calling ruins Internet for everyone
    » Iran saber-rattling boosts gas prices
    » Rich should pay more for protection

    A $10 word trending in today's news

    Debacle. n. A sudden and ignominious failure; a fiasco. [Newswordy]

    Daily from The Post-Standard

    » Today's lead editorial in The Post-Standard: Risking it all: Journalists are dying so world will know about Syria
    » The Opinion Page on syracuse.com
    » See all of today's Letters to the Editor | Submit a letter to the editor
    » Today's editorials
    » Frank Cammuso's cartoons
    » Columnist Sean Kirst


    Three others indicted on assault charges for shootings that occurred during the same disturbance.

    Syracuse, NY - A Syracuse man accused of fatally stabbing another man during a disturbance early Christmas Eve was justified in his actions, the prosecutor said today.

    Assistant District Attorney Melinda McGunnigle said a grand jury reached that conclusion in assessing the evidence against Nikeem Brown in the death of Sherman Jackson.

    Brown, 20, of 738 W. Onondaga St., had been charged with first-degree manslaughter as he recuperated in Upstate University Hospital from a gunshot wound he suffered in the Dec. 24 disturbance in the 200 block of South Alvord Street.

    A grand jury today indicted Brown only on a single misdemeanor charge of fourth-degree criminal possession of a weapon in the fatal stabbing.

    The same grand jury indicted three other men on felony assault and weapons charges in the disturbance.

    Christopher Mike, 26, of 929 S. Townsend St., is accused of seriously injuring Brown by shooting him during the incident. Mike is facing charges of first-degree assault and second-degree criminal possession of a weapon.

    The other two men - whose names are blacked out in the indictment because they have not yet formally been charged in the incident - are charged with acting together to seriously injure Mike by shooting him.

    They are both charged with first-degree assault and second-degree criminal possession of a weapon.

    According to McGunnigle, Jackson and Mike were together when Brown was shot by Mike and Jackson was stabbed by Brown. Jackson was not armed with any weapon but the grand jury was given instructions to consider that Brown was justified in defending himself, the prosecutor said.

    The two accused of shooting Mike were part of a third faction involved in the violent dispute, McGunnigle said.

    McGunnigle declined comment today on the order in which the stabbing and shootings took place during the disturbance.

    But one of the weapons involved in the shooting of Mike was recovered Jan. 12 when Jahari Jones, 18, of 115 S. Alvord St., was arrested with the weapon, McGunnigle said.

    Authorities said the weapon Mike was accused of possessing, a .22-caliber handgun, was found in an abandoned house after Mike was found on the porch of a home in the 500 block of Highland Street shortly after the Dec. 24 shootings.


    A refinery fire in Washington state is fuel further anxiety in the oil markets.

    Syracuse, NY – The pump price of gasoline shot up 13 cents a gallon in one day in Michigan and 3 cents in 14 other states in a surge one petroleum industry watcher predicts may be felt soon around Syracuse.

    GasBuddy.com, a company that monitors gas prices over the Internet, issued a warning Wednesday afternoon prices could fly as much as 20 cents a gallon nationwide by the end of the weekend.

    Syracuse probably will see a more modest increase, something in the range of 5 to 6 cents, said Patrick DeHaan, a senior petroleum analyst for the firm.

    Central New York so far appears to have avoided the projected run-up. At midday, regular gas was selling at an average price of $3.845 a gallon, unchanged from Wednesday, according to SyracuseGasPrices.com, GasBuddy’s local arm.

    The AAA motor club’s Daily Fuel Gauge Report put the local average at $3.844 a gallon, up 0.8 cents from Wednesday. The statewide average price also rose about a penny from the previous day, AAA reported.

    In Michigan, however, motorists who paid $3.45 a gallon on average Wednesday awoke this morning to find regular at $3.58 a gallon, according to AAA.

    Gas rose 10 cents in 24 hours in Ohio, 8 cents in Indiana, and 7 cents in Illinois, California, Oregon and West Virginia, according to AAA. Motor club figures also show gas up 6 cents in Kentucky, 5 cents in Washington state, 4 cents in Alaska,, Wisconsin and Oklahoma, and 3 cents in Iowa, Nevada and South Dakota.

    The oil markets, which already have bid petroleum higher over Mideast tensions, refinery shutdowns in the Northeast and the annual switchover to cleaner, pricier gas, are also reacting now to a fire Friday at a BP refinery in Washington state, DeHaan said.

    Keep up with local gas prices at Syracuse.com.


    Also: Even if you're not a Star Trek fan, you have to pity poor Worf -- he's always wrong.

    MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- A man who claimed to be the new manager of a Denny's restaurant in Wisconsin then cooked himself a cheeseburger and fries is facing charges.

    Police say 52-year-old James Summers, wearing a tie and carrying a briefcase, claimed he was sent by Denny's corporate office Tuesday to be the new manager at the restaurant in Madison. The current manager told him he must have the wrong restaurant. Summers told her she apparently had not received the memo about the change in leadership.

    Authorities say the manager called her supervisors while Summers helped himself to a meal. WISC-TV says police were summoned and took Summers into custody. Officers say they found a stun gun on his belt. Summers is charged with disorderly conduct, drug possession and possessing an electric weapon.

    And in other news
    » Top 10 worst food and drink world records [Yahoo!]

    » An 'adults only' church service in Florida. Why? The preacher is a registered sex-offender. [The Guardian]

    » Teenager admits to punching chicken

    » Taiwan cracks down on pigeon kidnapping

    » Worf is always wrong...



    Geddes police say an 87-year-old driver broadsided another car driven by a 73-year-old woman, and then told officers she did not know she was involved in a crash.

    2012-02-22-dl-accident.JPGView full sizeTwo drivers were taken by ambulance to area hospitals after a two-car crash in the westbound lane of West Genesee Street, at the entrance to the Route 5 on-ramp. Solvay volunteer firefighters were seen helping one victim (far right).

    Geddes, NY -- Two women were taken to area hospitals Wednesday evening after a crash at the entrance to the Route 5 exit, Geddes police chief Vic Gillette said.

    The crash happened in the westbound lane of West Genesee Street, at the entrance to the Route 5 on-ramp, which leads to the Route 5 bypass and Interstate 695, Gillette said.

    Here's what Geddes police say happened:

    At about 4:45 p.m. Wednesday, a 2012 Nissan car driven by Shirley McNamara, 73, of 501 Blueberry Lane, Geddes, headed north onto the Route 5 on-ramp in Geddes.

    At the same time, a 2005 Ford car driven by Helen Porter, 87, of 7 Champion Park on Route 5, Elbridge, was westbound on West Genesee Street.

    The cars collided and McNamara's Nissan rolled onto the driver's side.

    Porter was unable to provide officers with any information about the accident. She also didn't realize she was in an accident, Gillette said.

    McNamara told officers she was entering the on ramp to Route 5 when her car was struck on the passenger's side by the car Porter was driving, the police chief said. McNamara told officers she had a green light.

    A woman who witnessed the crash, but who was not involved, confirmed what McNamara told officers, Gillette said.

    McNamara complained of chest pain, and was taken to Upstate University Hospital at Community General in the town of Onondaga.

    Porter had injuries to her knee, lower leg and foot. She was taken Upstate University Hospital in Syracuse.

    Porter was issued a traffic ticket, charging her with driving an unregistered vehicle. She is scheduled to answer the ticket March 26 in Geddes Town Court.


    The issue is whether localities can ban hydrofracking even if the state says it's OK.

    2012-01-23-ap-NY-fracking1.JPGView full sizePeople take part in a rally at the Legislative Office Building in Albany recently against hydraulic fracturing, or hydrofracking, of Marcellus shale to release natural gas.

    By Lena Groeger, ProPublica

    In a decision that could set a national precedent for how local governments can regulate gas drilling, a New York state court this week ruled for the first time that towns have the right to ban drilling despite a state regulation asserting they cannot.

    At issue was a zoning law in Dryden, a township adjacent to Ithaca and the Cornell University campus, where drilling companies have leased some 22,000 acres for drilling. In August, Dryden's town board passed a zoning law that prohibits gas drilling within town limits. The next month, Denver-based Anschutz Exploration Corp. sued the town, saying the ban was illegal because state law trumped the municipal rules.

     

    As Anschutz noted, New York law promotes the development of oil and gas resources in the state. State Supreme Court Justice Phillip Rumsey addressed this point in his decision, writing: "Nowhere in legislative history provided to the court is there any suggestion that the Legislature intended — as argued by Anschutz — to encourage the maximum ultimate recovery of oil and gas regardless of other considerations, or to preempt local zoning authority."

    The Dryden case is merely the latest in a string of similar conflicts arising from Colorado to Pennsylvania that pit local communities against state oil and gas laws. It is common for local governments to zone industrial or commercial land, or to institute ordinances for noise or traffic. When it comes to the development of natural resources like oil and gas, the industry contends that local government shouldn't make those decisions.

    In New York, the controversy over state regulation of fracking has been brewing for years. In 2008, New York effectively put drilling on hold while it launched an environmental analysis of fracking, a process that uses a mix of highly pressurized water, sand and other chemicals to crack the earth deep underground. This is the first ruling on an industry effort to use the mineral extraction law to get around local bans.

    In addition to the environmental and health concerns over fracking, which we've covered in depth, a fundamental issue has been the rights of localities against state or federal laws. According to Eric Goldstein, a senior attorney for the Natural Resources Defense Council in New York, the right of local governments to determine their own land use has been guaranteed by the Constitution for over a century.

    "The argument is simple," said Goldstein. "New York state laws shouldn't override the authority of local governments to protect their constituents."

    In New York, two very similarly worded laws govern the regulation of mining and oil and gas drilling. The oil and gas provision gives the state the power to "regulate the development, production and utilization of natural resources of oil and gas." The town of Dryden argued that it was not trying to regulate fracking but merely trying to protect its citizens and property. It pointed out that courts have allowed towns to ban mining, and said Dryden should be allowed to do the same for fracking. The justice seemed to agree, concluding that the state's oil and gas laws don't prohibit localities from barring drilling.

    Anschutz's lawyer, Thomas West, said he was not sure whether the company would appeal the decision. Even if it does so, said Joseph Heath, an environmental attorney in New York, Tuesday's win could help set a precedent for other communities. Despite the threat of similar lawsuits from a major corporation, local fracking bans and moratoriums have continued to grow in the last few years.

    "People are now concentrating on local governments because that's the best form of protection against fracking," said Heath.

    Such protection is unlikely to come from the states, as New York's Department of Environmental Conservation has already deferred to the courts. When ProPublica interviewed the commissioner last year, we asked him specifically about the potential for conflict between local municipalities and states. He said it was likely "that the courts will need to decide these issues in a lawsuit between the town and the drilling company, not the state." Now, it looks as if at least one court has decided.

    "[The Dryden case] is an important indicator of how those battles are likely to play out," said the NRDC's Goldstein, "although it's not the final word."


    Panel discusses handling of Syracuse and Penn State scandals.

    2011-11-30-MeloCenter-EMB.JPGESPN reporter Mark Schwarz reporting on the Bernie Fine investigation Nov. 30 outside the Carmelo K. Anthony Basketball Center at Syracuse University.

    Media executives from news outlets that broke the Penn State and Syracuse child sex abuse investigations strongly defended their coverage of the scandals this morning during a symposium at Syracuse University.

    But editors from The Post-Standard and ESPN acknowledged more attention should be paid to the alleged victims in high-profile cases.

    The media panel began the daylong discussion, “When Games Turn Grim: Can Media Cover Sports Scandals Responsibly?” sponsored by the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications. It included Mike Feeley, assistant managing editor of The Patriot-News in Harrisburg, Pa.; Jeff D’Alessio, special assistant to the CEO, Sporting News; and Pete Thamel, college sports reporter for The New York Times.

    Michael Connor, executive editor of The Post-Standard, noted that competition compelled the newspaper to publish a story about sex abuse allegations against SU assistant basketball coach Bernie Fine. ESPN broke the news.

    The paper had investigated the allegations in 2002 but had decided there wasn’t enough evidence — and no police investigation — to substantiate accusations made by former ballboy Bobby Davis, Connor said.

    “We were not going to run story,” Connor told the crowd of about 100 people. “Once ESPN breaks a story, it’s a national story. At that point, it’s out there. It’s our program. It’s our community. We owe it to our readers to make sense of it.”

    Connor and senior ESPN vice president Vince Doria painted a picture of journalism ethics that can be at odds with what the public wants.

    “Hindsight is always 20/20 in these things,” said Doria, who is also director of news for the network. “We’ve always been very, very cautious to a fault in reporting these types of stories.”

    Later, he added: “We operate with a set of standards and principles that, if we just abandoned them for short-term gain, we might as well go into business with the police or any other ...”

    Those journalistic ethics focus on finding sufficient corroboration to print a story, but may not address the needs of the alleged victim, Connor said.

    After Post-Standard reporters quizzed Davis at length about his allegations of sex abuse leveled at Fine — including an 11-hour interview in Utah with Thursday panelist Mike McAndrew — Davis may have felt there was no other recourse after the paper decided not to print a story, Connor said.

    We may have “raised expectation in him that something was going to happen” in 2003, Connor said. “We did not give him recourse. It was if we had slammed the door in his face.”

    In the future, Connor said the newspaper might point an alleged victim to other outlets — including sexual abuse counselors — to address their issues if the newspaper does not feel it can print a story.

    But Connor — like the other media executives — defended the media’s handling of the case in the context of journalism ethics.

    He pointed to two opinion pieces he wrote in The Post-Standard describing the newspaper’s decision-making in the Fine case and said it would have been a breach of ethics to give police or SU information that reporters had from their investigation in 2002.

    Connor defended the paper’s decision not to turn over a recording of a compromising telephone call between Davis and Laurie Fine, the assistant coach’s wife, which suggests — but does not explicitly state — that there were transgressions by her husband.

    “It‘s sensational, it suggesting a perverse marital arrangement. We didn’t see evidence of a crime,” Connor said.

    When the recording was made nearly a decade ago, Connor said, the specific purpose was to see if Laurie Fine would admit to witnessing her husband sexually abusing Davis. That didn’t happen, Connor said.

    The paper had no obligation to turn that tape over to police or SU, just as the police or the university have no obligation to share information with the newspaper, Connor said.

    “We’re independent, we’re separate, and society is freer and healthier because of it,” the executive editor said,

    Thamel, a Syracuse University alumnus and sports reporter for The New York Times, said there was a big difference between the SU and Penn State scandals.

    At Penn State, there was an official investigation, with a grand jury report vetted for years by investigators, Thamel said of the scandal involving assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky.

    With Bernie Fine, “it was two guys on ESPN” making accusations, Thamel said.

    Doria said he can’t say how much Penn State’s scandal influenced ESPN’s decision to run the Fine story. But he said the network found Davis credible enough to air given a second accuser, Mike Lang, came forward.

    The nature of competitive news also influenced ESPN’s decision, Doria said. The network knew The Post-Standard had information about the story and that police were opening an investigation. Officers came looking for Davis and Lang at ESPN’s studios, wanting to question them, Doria said.

    “Rightly or wrongly at that point, it gave the story immediacy in our mind,” he said.

    But that motivation to break the news also led to the story coming out piecemeal. The tape between Davis and Laurie Fine, for example, didn’t come out for many days. Doria said that was because ESPN wanted to try and interview Laurie Fine and send it to voice recognition experts before using it.

    That delay led many people to believe the network was prolonging the coverage on purpose, he said. Syracuse men’s basketball coach Jim Boeheim is being sued for slander for making critical comments about Davis and Lang after the initial stories, before the tape came out.

    SU Chancellor Nancy Cantor wrote in USA Today that she would have fired Fine earlier had she known the tape existed.

    But The Post-Standard and ESPN each defended their handling of the tape, noting there was very little proof from it. Doria called it background information that was one piece of evidence used in determining the alleged victims’ credibility.

    “Without video proof, at some point you’re making a decision that I believe a source is trustworthy,” Doria said. “The risk is high — it’s not like trading a baseball player.”


    The second panel, "The Advocates," at 1 p.m., includes Robert Hoatson, executive director of Road to Recovery; Katherine Redmond, founder of the National Coalition Against Violent Athletes; Julie Cecile, executive director of McMahon/Ryan Child Advocacy Center in Syracuse; and Allison Young, director of sexual abuse services with Elmcrest Children's Center in Syracuse.

    The third panel, "The PR Professionals," at 2:30 p.m., includes Leland Bassett, chairman and CEO of Bassett and Bassett Incorporated, Communications Managers and Counselors; Keith Burton, president of Insidedge; Gary Grates, principal of WCG Worldwide; and Kelly Rossman-McKinney, CEO and principal, Truscott Rossman.

    The fourth panel, "The Ethicists," at 3:50 p.m., includes David Rubin, professor and dean emeritus of Newhouse School; Tom Rosenstiel, director and founder of the Project for Excellence in Journalism; and Robert Steele, professor and director of the Janet Prindle Institute for Ethics at DePauw University.

    Each panel will conclude with a question-and-answer session.

    The event is free and open to the public. Parking is available in SU pay lots. For more information about the event, see sportsandscandal.syr.edu.


    Chano Tamez also admitted stealing from parked car in Lysander.

    Syracuse, NY - A Van Buren man is facing two to six years in state prison after admitting in County Court today to robbing a cab driver in Liverpool last year.

    Chano R. Tamez, 21, of State Fair Boulevard, pleaded guilty before Judge Anthony Aloi to a felony charge of third-degree robbery in the Sept. 18 holdup.

    According to authorities, a cab driver from CNY Green Taxi Service responded to the Covered Bridge apartment complex on Vine Street to take a fare to the airport. But Tamez got in the cab, pointed what appeared to be a handgun at the driver's head, demanded money and fled with about $100, officials said.

    Assistant District Attorney Shawn Weed said the victim later said the robber was armed with what appeared to be a pipe or a screwdriver and not a gun, accounting for the lesser robbery charge.

    Tamez also pleaded guilty today to an unrelated felony charge of fourth-degree grand larceny. He admitted stealing more than $1,000 in property from a car parked in the driveway of the owner's home in the town of Lysander Sept. 26.

    Assistant District Attorney Mary Gorman said that plea satisfied charges from several car break-ins attributed to Tamez.

    Aloi promised Tamez a sentenced of two to six years in prison for the grand larceny to be served at the same time as the penalty for the robbery.

    Sentencing is set for March 19.


    Robert Hoatson says the person he talked to isn't ready to come forward.

    Robert Hoatson, executive director of Road to Recovery, said he's spoken to a person who says he was abused by a head coach at Syracuse University, but he did not name either person. Hoatson, a sexual abuse victims' rights advocate, was speaking today at a symposium on media coverage of the Penn State and Syracuse University sex abuse investigations.

    Four victims’ advocates of sexual abuse were discussing how the media can better cover abuse cases when one of the panelists, Robert Hoatson, began talking specifically about the Bernie Fine case.

    Hoatson, of Road to Recovery, said that a man had contacted him after the Fine investigation last November to say he had been abused by a head coach at least a decade ago. Hoatson told the audience at the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications that the alleged victim had given Hoatson permission to make the allegation, but did not feel comfortable coming forward.

    SU issued a news release this afternoon saying the university had no information about the allegation.

    But, “we have made the police and district attorney aware of Mr. Hoatson’s remark,” said Kevin Quinn, senior vice president of public affairs for the university. “We encourage any victim to come forward and report abuse to the authorities.”

    Syracuse Police Sgt. Thomas Connellan said the department was aware of Hoatson because he had gotten involved with Zach Tomaselli in the Bernie Fine case.

    But Connellan said he was not aware of any contact by Hoatson to the police department about the accusation he made at today's symposium.

    "As far as I know this is the first we're hearing of it," Connellan said.

    At the panel discussion, a Syracuse University professor, John Nicholson, pointedly asked Hoatson why he was casting a shadow of suspicion on all SU head coaches.

    "What in the world are you saying?" Nicholson asked.

    Hoatson said he didn't see it that way. "People should know," he said. "It's not just Bernie Fine. It could be another coach."

    After the panel, Hoatson said he knew the name of the coach but did not know if the coach was still at Syracuse University.

    Read previous coverage of When Games Turn Grim


    The Skaneateles Chamber of Commerce offers suggestions and seeks ideas from community to capitalize on the out of town business from the Louisville/SU game on Saturday, March 3. Watch video

    A roundup of news and events from west Onondaga County communities

    The Skaneateles Chamber of Commerce has created “Skaneateles Savors SU Basketball Weekend” from March 2 through 4.

    They are offering suggestions and are seeking ideas from the community to capitalize on the out of town business from the Louisville/SU game on Saturday, March 3.

    Some businesses have already come up with ideas, according to the Skaneateles Press. The Sherwood has several rooms booked of fans coming up for the game, Skaneateles Town Square is offering 10 percent off selected items, Skaneateles Bakery will have special SU sugar cookies, Paris Flea will offer a discount for anyone wearing blue, orange, red and/or white.

    Suggestions for area businesses:
    • Put out an SU flag or banner if you have one.
    • Put out signs that say: Welcome Louisville Cardinal Fans (colors are red and white).
    • Lodging businesses, create a package for the Louisville fans.
    • Businesses, create a special drink or dish, such as an Orange Crush the Cardinals Drink. A Cardinal Deal of the Day, a Louisville Slugger.
    • Show your ticket for the SU/Louisville game and get a free drink, or 10 percent or something like that.

    Chamber director Sue Dove wants to hear your ideas: Email or call 685-0552 or post your ideas in the comment section below.

    More West news:
    » Two drivers sent to area hospitals after crash on West Genesee St. at Route 5 on-ramp in Geddes [The Post-Standard]
    » Visible house numbers vital [Skaneateles Journal]
    » Bijou Hair Salon treasures making customers feel and look good [The Post-Standard]

    West resources
    » Today's weather forecast
    » Today's obituaries
    » What's going on? Events calendar for Western Onondaga County
    » Onondaga County reported crimes database
    » See all west news on syracuse.com
    » Police Blotter


older | 1 | .... | 938 | 939 | 940 | (Page 941) | 942 | 943 | 944 | .... | 1993 | newer